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Five ways Nigerians can avoid deportation from the UK

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THE United Kingdom’s (UK)) post-study visa route, which allows graduates to stay in the UK for at least two years after completing an academic programme in the country, has become the top choice for many Nigerians seeking greener pastures abroad.

A new Points-Based Immigration System was also introduced, effective from January 1, 2021, which allows employers to recruit people to work in the UK in a specific job in an eligible skilled occupation.


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With the Graduate Route, students won’t require a job offer to be eligible for the visa, which also applies to those who choose to be self-employed in the UK after graduation.

Students can study part-time while working, enrol in language courses, or any other study options that do not require sponsorship under the student route.

As a result, in 2021, the number of Nigerians who received Sponsored Study grants grew to 36,783 from 8, 229 and 7, 860 in 2020 and 2019 respectively, placing Nigeria in the third place among top five nations to benefit from the programme last year.

However, the UK recently signed a new migration agreement with Nigeria that will witness a mass deportation of “dangerous” migrants.

Below are five ways Nigerians looking to make the UK their new home can avoid being deported:

  • Avoid illegal migration routes,
  • Ensure all travel documents are authentic,
  • Do not overstay your visas; Nigerians may be able to extend their Student visa to stay longer and continue their course or study a new course.
  • Avoid the temptation to work or study on a tourist visa or non-immigrant visa waiver.
  • Avoid entering into forced or fraudulent marriages.

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