fbpx
Promoting Good Governance.

#RevolutionNow protest: Counsel vows to review court detention order on Sowore

INIHEBE Effiong, Counsel to Omoyele Sowore, Convener of the #RevolutionNow protest has vowed to file a new application to ‘vacate’ and counter today’s court ruling which extended Sowore’s detainment to 45 days.  

Justice Taiwo Taiwo of the Abuja Federal High Court, Thursday morning, earlier granted to the Department of State Security Service (DSS) right to keep the accused in their custody pending the outcome of investigations by the security operatives.

But Effiong, who is also the National Legal Adviser of the African Action Congress (AAC), a political platform Sowore rode to contest for presidency in 2019, described the decision as a cowardly attempt by the Federal Government to clamp down on innocent citizens.

“We will review the decision and see the reasons adduced by the judge and also possibly make an application to have that order vacated,” Effiong told The ICIR.

He said the application would be made next week.

“We respect the court. But we are still of the position that the federal government does not have any reason in law, to have even made the application to say you want to detain him because the issues that led to his arrest are matters of public knowledge.”

Sowore, ahead of the planned nationwide #RevolutionNow protest was arrested by the security operatives. But the arrest has largely been condemned by the Nigerian Labour Congress, Amnesty International Nigeria office and other notable Nigerians who have demanded his release.

Moreover, Effiong emphasised that a team of defense lawyers lead by Femi Falana, a Senior Advocate of Nigeria (SAN) would have developed new strategies prior today’s ruling but resolved to suspend the undisclosed move until when needed.

He insisted the actions against Sowore infringed on fundamental human rights of the activist.

“If the terrorism Act is now being used to clamp down on people who disagreed with the government, it is a sad commentary for the country and as human rights lawyers; it is a collective responsibility to ensure the precedent is not set.”

 

Comment on this:

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.