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Abuja

Gridlock clogs Mararaba/Nyanya axis as security operatives intensify stop-and-search operations

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STOP-AND-SEARCH operations by security operatives at Mararaba/Nyanya axis of the Federal Capital territory on Wednesday caused heavy traffic gridlock for commuters moving into Abuja.

The ICIR learnt that the traffic gridlock started from Karu Bridge and stretched beyond Mararaba due to the barricade mounted by the security operatives under the bridge.

The security operatives consisted of officers of the Nigerian Army, Nigeria Security and Civil Defence Corps (NSCDC) and the Nigeria Police Force.

Cars on the route were stopped and searched by the operatives before being allowed passage.

Spokesperson for the Nigerian Army Onyeama Nwachukwu told The ICIR that it was part of the ongoing operations of security agencies across regions of the country.

“We are conducting these exercises in South-South, South-East and the North-Centra. Part of these exercises includes stop and search. In so doing, we would ensure that it is professional and they respect fundamental human rights. They do it in conjuction with other security agencies,” Nwachukwu said.

He said the exercises were often conducted in the last quarter of the year to nab persons transporting small weapons and ensure peace in the regions.

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However, The Sun reported that “security reports obtained by the military late Tuesday night indicated that attackers were planning to enter the FCT through the Abuja-Keffi expressway and other entry points.”

The newspaper said some suspects had been arrested and were helping security agencies in forestalling any attack on Nigeria’s capital.

Many communities in the FCT have been ravaged by kidnapping, abduction and other insecurities.

On Tuesday, November 2, gunmen attacked the University of Abuja and abducted staff and their family members at the staff quarters.

The Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU), University of Abuja (UNIABUJA) Chapter Chairman Kassim Umaru, also confirmed the abduction of six people, including two professors.

Those abducted, according to Umar, were Professor Obansa and his son; Professor Oboscolo, his son and daughters, as well as Dr Tobins.

Umaru said the attack on the school was successful due to the security lapses on the campus.

Earlier in October, some gunmen had kidnapped 24 persons in Kuje Local Government Area of the FCT.

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FCT communities such as Gwagwalada, Mpape, Pegi and Kuchibena, among others, have been under attack by gunmen who kidnap and abduct residents.

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